For this assignment, each student will work on presentation on High Renaissance/

For this assignment, each student will work on presentation on High Renaissance/ Mannerism architects and the Renaissance in France and England. Each student will select one building / structure/design from each of the following:
Raphael
Giorgio Vasari
Michelangelo
Andrea Palladio
Garden Design
Renaissance in France
Renaissance in England
Please note: You have to choose and provide information for all of the listed topics, not just one of them.
Each student will create a presentation based on his or her studying and research, using any suitable software/web tool: PowerPoint, Adobe Spark, Voice Tread, Prezi etc.
Submit the presentation to Blackboard as a hyperlink, if a web based presentational tool was utilized, or as a pdf or PowerPoint file.
File name: XX-Renaissance II
Presentation
Content: the presentation should include the following information for each of topics listed above:
The name of the architect and / or region.
Short biographical information.
Information about the selected building / design:
The name of the building
Geographical location (show maps, if possible).
Purpose of the building or garden design
What architectural features make the presented work representative of the Renaissance and the architects themselves.
Identify major Renaissance and Classical elements in the presented works and explain their significance.
Provide high quality images for each of the presented buildings and designs
Explain why you have selected that particular building / design
If the selected structure inspires you, explain why. If it does not inspire you – explain why.
Structure of the presentation:
Title page stating the name of the presentation (The Renaissance Part II), the name of the student presenting, and the class for which is the presentation.
Content pages: 10 – 12 pages.
Reference page, citing the research and images’ resources (usually the last page), if references are not provided along the text and images.
General Requirements for the presentation:
The presentation should be consistent in format and outlook, text font and size, and page design.
Do not copy and paste from your resources, there will be check for plagiarism. Use not only the assigned book and the internet, but also other resources.
Make an effort to create informative, interesting and pleasing presentation, with good quality images and layout, prompting conversations and discussions.

DUE Week#2A: VOCABULARY In the Design Brief, you will come across the following

DUE Week#2A: VOCABULARY
In the Design Brief, you will come across the following words/terms:
BARIATRIC POPULATION DESIGN
BIOPHILIC DESIGN
1. Please visit each site and give a minimum 1/2 page explanation of the word/term. Please make it easy to read and comprehend.
2. In addition choose an article related to each word/term that you feel will add to your knowledge of the subject and project. Add the link to the article, a quick summary, and why you selected this particular article.

Module 9 -75225 covers the proper approach to conducting accident investigations

Module 9 -75225 covers the proper approach to conducting accident investigations. You are to prepare an accident investigation following the guidelines presented in sections 1.2.0 through 2.0.0 and utilizing the following case:
A high-rise condominium project, 14 stories high, is approximately 75% completed when two journeymen electricians are hit by falling sheet rock debris. The two electricians were tying in electrical panel boards on the 10th floor. The dry wall contractor’s workers were installing sheet rock on the 11th floor. One of the electricians required treatment for cuts on-site, the other was rushed to the hospital by EMS with a serious head injury.

Introduction The first step in writing a successful academic paper is producing

Introduction
The first step in writing a successful academic paper is producing an outline to guide your work. As a first step in writing your Final Paper, this outline assignment requires you to select a paper topic, produce a working title and abstract, outline the paper contents, and create a list the anticipated sources for the final paper. Completing the assignment and subsequent feedback will help to ensure the final paper aligns with the Final Paper assignment and has a clear focus.
Assignment
Before going further, review the assignment for Final Paper . You cannot complete this paper outline assignment without a full understanding of the contents of the Final Paper assignment.
Produce an outline with the following 4 components:
1. Working Title
Draft a working title for your paper, which should include the name of the selected work of architecture.
2. Abstract
Write a 250- to 350-word abstract, including a brief introduction, an identification of your chosen topic, and a thesis statement. Underline your thesis statement to emphasize it within the abstract.
3. Paragraph Outline
Produce an outline that highlights the topic / content of each paragraph. The outline should have at least 5 paragraphs, but will likely have more due to the required length of the paper. The paper must include an introduction paragraph and a concluding paragraph. Write one or two sentences for each paragraph outlined to communicate the focus and what will be discussed.
4. Anticipated Sources
Produce a list of the sources you plan to utilize in writing the paper. These sources should be provided in a bibliography format using Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. A minimum of 8 scholarly sources is required. The course textbook and lectures can be used as sources for the paper, but they do not count toward the minimum number of required sources.
Additional Guidance for Producing the Outline
Thesis Statement
A strong thesis statement is key to the writing of a successful academic paper. Typically placed at the end of the first paragraph, the thesis statement should be specific, state your argument, and layout what will be covered in the body of the paper.
For example, two thesis statements are provided below discussing Frank Lloyd Wright, a well-known American Architect. (Note: the examples below do not align with the topic for Paper 1, they are provided as general guidance.)
Frank Lloyd Wright was the best architect who ever lived in America and changed residential architecture forever with his passion and dedication. (WEAK THESIS)
A staunch proponent of neo-vernacular architecture in the early 20th century, Architect Frank Lloyd Wright impacted the residential American landscape through his critical writings, built works, and pedagogic apprenticeship program. (STRONG THESIS)
The second example is stronger than the first because it communicates:
a specific scope or focus for the paper (Wright is the focus)
takes a position (Wright impacted the residential American landscape)
outlines three examples / sources to prove the position (critical writings, built works, and pedagogic apprenticeship program)
Uses keywords and terms from the discipline that bring additional clarity, focus, and specificity
Paragraph Outline
Using the thesis statement as a guide, the paragraph outline should communicate how the content of the paper will be organized. The introduction paragraph should include the thesis statement. Each body paragraph should have a clear idea, which points back to the thesis statement, and includes evidence to support your idea. Be as specific as possible, with focus and clarity.
To plan for the content and organization of each body paragraph, it’s helpful to review a typical outline for each body paragraph, sentence by sentence.
Body Paragraph Topic Sentence: Expresses the main idea of a paragraph
Supporting Sentence: Sub-points that further explain and/or develop the main idea; Aim for 1 – 3 supporting sentences per paragraph.
Detailing Sentences: Concrete examples, research, case studies, etc. that prove your supports; Aim for 1 -3 detailing sentences for every supporting sentence.
Concluding Sentence: Brings paragraph to closure; also often transitions to the next paragraph.
Resources for Paper Writing
The UF Writing Studio is a free service for current UF graduate and undergraduate students. Students have the opportunity to work one-on-one with a consultant on issues specific to their own particular development. Appointments can be made on their website for virtual consultations (https://writing.ufl.edu/writing-studio/). These consultations are especially helpful to students who may need assistance with developing a thesis, using research to back up the position taken in the thesis, and organizing their thoughts / content within the paper.
Introduction
Works of architecture are physical artifacts that can be understood and interpreted as historical, cultural, and aesthetic products. They are directly related to the time and place in which they were produced, including who designed and built them. For the Paper, each student will select one work of architecture covered in the course to focus on. Students should first carefully investigate the physical specifics of the work of architecture they have selected, such as the spatial layout, materials, construction techniques, site / grounds, etc. Students should utilize a range of sources and materials for their investigation, such as: photographs; written history; interviews; design and construction documents; material sources and selections; and more.
After gaining an understanding of the physical artifact, students should interpret the architecture as a historical, cultural, and aesthetic product. This interpretation reveals how the time and place shaped its creation. For example, the architecture or architect who designed it might have been: aligned with a historical movement, an embodiment of a style or approach to design, influenced by creative work (literature, art, dance, etc) of the time period, etc. Students should seek to understand how the work of architecture came into being, and and use the physical specifics of the architecture to prove their thesis or position within the paper.
Assignment
Choose one work of architecture covered in the course, either in course lectures or the textbook. This selection must be a single work of architecture and NOT a collection of structures. For example, students may NOT pick the Great Pyramids of Giza. Students MAY pick one of the pyramids to focus on. The reason why: selecting a collection of buildings produces a paper that is too broad and tries to cover too much material. Students should select a single work of architecture in order to be as specific as possible in their analysis.
Write a 3,000-word paper that studies and interprets the work of architecture as a historical, cultural, technical and aesthetic product. The paper should be a holistic interpretation of the work of architecture, investigating a range of internal and external factors, as explained in the introduction above. The paper SHOULD NOT be a research report or book report, which is a recounting of facts about the work of architecture. This paper SHOULD BE an interpretation of the information students discover about the work of architecture. Each paper must be guided by an original thesis statement, which summarizes the student’s argument and takes a unique position about the work of architecture. Analysis and synthesis of research is required to produce a paper that satisfies this assignment.
Thesis Statement
The paper must include a thesis statement. Within the first paragraph, this thesis statement communicates the ‘big idea’ to the reader and, then in future paragraphs, is backed up by evidence / research. To formulate the thesis statement, helpful questions might be: In studying the architecture, what have you noticed? What questions or ideas have begun to formulate? What would I like to prove about the architecture in my paper?
Additional guidance about formulating this thesis statement is offered in the “Paper Outline” assignment. If a student is unfamiliar with how to write a strong thesis statement, they are strongly encouraged to seek assistance from the UF Writing Studio (more information below).
Additional Guidance for Producing the Paper
To begin, conduct some initial research to identify works of architecture you might be interested to write about. You may select a work from any portion of the course, even if we haven’t covered it by the time the paper is due. Remember, this paper requires significant effort and time on your part, so be sure to select a paper topic that interests you and you hope to learn more about.
In finalizing your selection, be sure there are ample resources available to you to produce a paper of the required length. Do not overlook sources which may be focused on the architect, time period, etc, rather than the individual work of architecture only. A minimum of 8 scholarly sources is required for the paper. Scholarly sources are academic in nature and/or are written by experts. General sources, like Wikipedia, are NOT scholarly. The course textbook and lectures can be used as sources for the paper, but they do NOT count toward the minimum number of sources.
In your research and interpretation, the physical characteristics of the work of architecture are likely to stand out to you, as these are easily seen and assessed in photos and drawings. In addition to the physical, don’t overlook the range of intangible factors that guided the creation of the architectural work. For example, the specific preferences of the architect, the financial budget available, and the time period.
Don’t overlook the importance of architectural ‘site’ and ‘context’. The architectural site is composed of the physical characteristics and parameters of the land the work of architecture is located on or within. The topography, property boundaries, trees and other flora, and soil types are all characteristics of the site. For example: Does the project nestle or fit within the site, or is it in contrast? How did the location of large trees impact what could be designed and built? How did the architect respond to the steep slope of the land? The architectural context is a much broader concept, including characteristics of the surroundings. Examples of the physical surroundings are climate, landscape, rainfall, adjacent buildings, and streets. For example: How does the annual rainfall and temperature impact the design? How does the architecture address the shade from the adjacent building?
When interpreting the architecture, consider the socio/cultural/historical surroundings, such as the time period, cultural traditions, client / owner, and daily life. For example: Can we see the cultural tradition of basket-weaving within the architecture? How did other creative works impact the architect at the time this project was designed and built? Are the construction methods typical for this area of the world?
Consider how the work of architecture has been used over time. If the project had an original client or user, what were the original goals for the projects? How did the design meet their needs? Investigate how the work of architecture might have been used differently over various time periods to address changing needs or preferences. How is the project being used today?
In the writing of the paper, be sure to use a formal academic style of writing. While you’ll be communicating your ideas and conclusions, you should write from a third person point of view. You should NOT use first person statements using “I”, “me”, or “my”.
Resources for Paper Writing
The UF Writing Studio is a free service for current UF graduate and undergraduate students. Students have the opportunity to work one-on-one with a consultant on issues specific to their own particular development. Appointments can be made on their website for virtual consultations (https://writing.ufl.edu/writing-studio/). These consultations are especially helpful to students who may need assistance with developing a thesis, using research to back up the position taken in the thesis, and organizing their thoughts / content within the paper.
Detailed Paper Requirements
Note the detailed requirements outlined below. Points will be deducted for not following the prescribed format, citation style, etc.
General
– 3,000 (minimum) word count.
– The paper must follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (Resources (Links to an external site.) available within the Purdue Owl.)
– Use New Times Roman font, 12 point, single-spaced, with all margins set to one inch (1”).
Word Count
The paper must be a minimum of 3,000 words. Using the “word count” tool in Microsoft Word, the word count quantifies the body of the paper. The word count does NOT include image captions, bibliography, or footnotes. The abstract written for the Paper Outline can be incorporated into the body of the paper and contribute to the word count. If not incorporated (ie. the abstract is a stand alone paragraph at beginning of the paper), it does not contribute to the word count.
Cover Page
Create a cover page that includes the following information in the upper left corner of the page:
– Title of Paper
– Student’s Name
– Course and Section Number, Semester and Year
– Word Count of the Student’s Paper
Images
The paper should include a minimum of 5 images. Select images that enhance or illustrate the ideas you are discussing. Each image should be clearly labeled, have a caption, and the source is clearly cited in the footnotes at the bottom of the page. For example: “Figure 1: The north façade clearly features the library entrance and the intricate Art Deco details.32″ The image label (ie. Figure 1) should be referred to in the body of the paper to connect the paper text with the images.
The images should be included on their own pages after the paper text and before the bibliography. Note: The images and their captions do not contribute towards or reduce the word count.
Citations + Citation Style
Use Chicago Style 17th edition for footnotes (embedded at the bottom of each page) and a bibliography (at the conclusion of the paper). The Purdue Owl is a great source for citation information and guidance (Link to Resources (Links to an external site.)). For Chicago Style citations, the bibliography format is slightly different from the footnote format. Note: Chicago Style is a specific format style and different than APA style, more commonly used in high school courses.
Required Sources (8 minimum)
– A minimum of 8 scholarly sources is required. The course textbook and lectures can be used as sources for the paper, but they do not count toward the minimum number of sources.
– Research for this paper should come from a variety of scholarly sources. Consider: books; journal articles; videos / documentaries; interviews; design and construction documents; and academically recognized web sources.
– Do not use Wikipedia or similar Wiki encyclopedia-like pages. These sources can be edited at any time by users and their information is not verified.
To begin a search for scholarly sources, visit the UF Architecture and Fine Arts Library webpage. E-books, online journals, and other scholarly publications can be accessed through the UF Libraries Catalog and Databases.
File Submittal on Canvas
Submit your paper file in Canvas in a ‘.doc’ or ‘.docx’ format. Your file name should be formatted as follows: “Student Last Name_Student First Name_Work of Architecture”. For example, “Smith_Jane_Notre Dame.doc”.
Grading and Evaluation
A grading rubric is provided below. Papers will be evaluated for a grade and for fulfillment of the University’s Writing Requirement.
Integrated into Canvas, Turnitin will be used to review the paper submissions. Turnitin is a software that reviews students’ papers to prevent plagiarism and protect authorship. The software assesses the percentage of text within the students’ paper that is drawn from outside sources, both properly cited text and improperly cited text.
Scores above 25% are problematic and points will be deducted, as they indicate a large percentage of the paper is drawn directly from outside sources (word for word) and/or there is not enough text produced by the student. A high score may indicate plagiarism. But in most cases, a high score indicates that more synthesis and analysis of research is needed to balance the content of the paper. Students need to be mindful of the number and length of direct quotes, as a majority of the paper should be original writing. Its important to note that Turnitin scores can be inflated due to a large number of footnote citations / bibliography sources and this issue is taken into account with the 25% window.

Choose one of the period rooms below and write a 2-3 page paper: Analyzing its s

Choose one of the period rooms below and write a 2-3 page paper:
Analyzing its spatial layout, furnishings, materials and additional features.
Describing the background of the designer/architect and that of the owner as well as the function that the room might have originally served.
Answering at least two of the following questions:
——How did the cultural, religious, political, economic context inform this room’s appearance?
—— How is the room different today than in its original context? What has changed and why?
—— How did the interior arrive at its current institution? What questions does this raise for conservation and/or repatriation?
CHOOSE FROM:
The Temple of Dendur (MMA)
Mastaba Tomb of Perneb (MMA)
Bedroom from the Villa of P. Fannius Synistor at Boscoreale (MMA)
Chapter House from Notre Dame de Pontaut (The Cloisters)
Sudiolo from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio (MMA)
Shoin Room modeled after a room at the Kangaku-in, outside Kyoto (MMA)
Damascus Room (MMA)
Bedroom from the Sagredo Palace (MMA)
Boudoir from the Hotel de Crillon (MMA)
Moorish Smoking Room, Worsham-Rockefeller House (Brooklyn Museum)
Wisteria Dining Room (MMA)
Weil-Worgelt Study (Brooklyn Museum)
RESEARCH:
Use the museum websites and online resources in the Pratt Library (such as e-journals, e-books and other databases) to find additional information. Random blogs and websites are NOT good sources in an academic paper!
Make sure to properly cite your sources for images and information using MLA bibliographic style: https://libguides.pratt.edu/c.php?g=763466&p=5475220
General Writing Tips:
Outline your paper first. Each paragraph should have a clear and distinct purpose, and should begin with a topic sentence that declares that purpose–or directly expands on the paragraph before it.
Use full sentences; check for run-on sentences.
Avoid the repetition of the same word over and over again.
Delete overly personal phrases such as “I find it interesting that…” or “I think”.
Be careful and specific in your descriptions–is it just “blue” or aqua, sapphire, turquoise, cobalt, cerulean, etc.?
Avoid describing the works in terms of vague personal judgement (beautiful, pretty, awesome, good).